14 thoughts on “Don’t gnocchi it until you’ve tried it

  1. Hey, Jenn, we have to get you your own cable show! That looks good. I just made my late-grandmother’s pierogi recipie on Sunday. I’m the only one in the family that knows how to make them. So my sister & father are beholden to me!
    hahahahahahaha

  2. Too funny, I married into an Italian family and I love the stories of MomMom teaching my wife and sister in-law all about the gnocchi.

    By the way Jenn – ‘Don’t gnocchi it until you’ve tried it.’ Absolutely brilliant. That knocks your farmers market one (‘A common setting, uncommonly fresh’) to second place.

  3. Mmmmm… yummy.

    I’m half-Italian, and I can still remember my Nonni making gnocchi on her ancient bread-board in her basement kitchen. Like all good Italians, she had two kitchens in her house. 🙂

    She’s 91 now, and doesn’t cook anymore… but my sister makes gnocchi, and they’re excellent. Too bad she lives in Atlanta. 😦

    Your daughter looks like she’s having such a fun time with her Nonni!

    Great, now I’m hungry again!

  4. Ok -my mom and ALL her friends STILL have two kitchens in their house. I mean, like all good italians….My daughter and I tried butternut gnocci – also good (use it in place of potatoes)…and a great Farmers Market recipe. Have you ever bought them in Super stop and shop? I have…it went like this “Price check on the …..”Ga no – ch I?” ok I can’t do it justice…just make them get a price on it.

  5. It’s the butter. If you just sauce the gnocchi with a regular marinara or meat sauce, it’s not a heart attack on a plate.

    I never buy gnocchi because we usually get it from my mother-in-law and now, of course, I know how to make it so I’ll never have to suffer through the Stop & Shop price check!

  6. Another secret is that you can omit the eggs completely — in effect, making the gnocchi vegan. My Nonni (who was old-school Italian) didn’t use eggs in her gnocchi… just potatoes and flour… I watched her do it myself, but I still can’t tell you how she made it all come together.

    I’ve tried Pastene and Trader Joe’s gnocchi, and they’re virtually inedible. Once you’ve had them old-world style, you just can’t go back.

  7. There’s a little hole-in-the-wall cafe in Franklin called the Union Cafe. Best gnocchi’s around. (Next to Jenn and her mother-in-law’s, of course)

    I’m 100% Irish, so my ancestors got as far as boiling the potatoes and that was it…we needed something to eat with the Guinness.

    My wife’s family is Polish. All of my in-laws would rave about my mother-in-law’s Gwumpkies. I never understood what the big deal was…ground beef and rice wrapped in over-cooked cabbage…yech.

  8. Isn’t in “glumpkis” ? I love ’em! A glumpki or two with a little sour cream is a real treat!

    Speaking of treats, anyone doing anything interesting for Valentine’s day?

  9. I just remember my mother-in-law making Golabki (glumpki) and bringing it over for us after I had my son — and not realizing cabbage wasn’t a good idea for a breastfeeding mother. Poor baby screamed all night, even more than usual.

    BTW, new Greater Grafton milestone — yesterday’s blog hits totaled 1,018!

  10. Hi everyone! Just found this blog the other day, interesting! Hey, not to get off the gnocci subject, a friend and I were trying to think of the name of the Irish (some say British) sausage. It’s typically served with mashed potato. Does anyone know the name, or where it can be purchased?

  11. I googled several variations of Golabki and found the same recipes for all of them. And, Sarah’s mom is correct, the only spelling with a Wikipedia entry was “Golabki”. And. like I always say…if Wikipedia says it…then, it must be true. 🙂

    By the way…MS Word spell-checker didn’t recognize any of them. This is the only blog that I comment on where I run everything through a spell-checker before hitting that ‘Submit Comment’ button. (Oh, and ‘Googled’ isn’t a word either…go figure).

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