Cold patch party!

If you have the chance to catch Tuesday night’s Board of Selectmen meeting on cable, do it — it felt like one of the weirder meetings I’ve been to, from the “surprise” flag presentation to Ernie Peters’ (I love Ernie. He’s going to be a Local Yocal tomorrow) chastising of the board for even thinking of putting an article on the Town Meeting warrant, again, that would give town employees the ability to write tickets for health or building code infractions, among other things.

I was not surprised when I left the meeting to discover the moon was nearly full.

But one item that came up was, again, Cortland Manor. Specifically, the residents’ concerns about the potholes in certain areas — the street is without a top coat on one end — and worries about getting stranded come winter since LeClaire defaulted on the neighborhood. The town, along with a rep from Travelers Insurance, has come out to view the road but the verdict, apparently, was that the potholes aren’t quite big enough to be patched.

Mary Ann Cotton suggested a cold patch party. I think she was half joking but, after checking with the town to make sure that it wouldn’t affect the efforts to claim the bond or be seen as damaging the road, the first-ever Cortland Manor Cold Patch Party was held this morning.

You think I’m joking?

coldpatch

I came home from WSRS this morning (anyone notice me on the radio? I was shadowing Greg Byrne for a story. Why yes, I did get up at 4 a.m.!) to find Andrea and Chris tamping down the patch on the very last pothole. I did not take their picture. There are some things you just don’t do to tired neighbors armed with tools. They did an awesome job, I thought, and most of the neighborhood is chipping in on the cost.

I’m just hoping we don’t have to dig ourselves out come winter!

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11 thoughts on “Cold patch party!

  1. Thanks for NOT taking our picture! We appreciated that. Thanks to everyone for chipping in and stopping by to say thank you. I hope our work will serve as a lasting legacy to the neighborhood…ah – scratch that – it would just be nice if the repairs last until Spring! 🙂

  2. A big THANK YOU! to Chris and Andrea for not only taking this project on but for also cutting and trimming down the weeds that were along the sidewalk down to the mail boxes at the Crosby Road entrance!!!

    It looks great!

    I know we really appreciate it!

  3. BOOO to the town and all of the “townies” who posted on the article at the Grafton Times who basically are telling residents on private streets “too bad for you”. HOOORAY for the residents of Cortland Manor who decided to take some action for themselves.

    I’m on a private road that is in process of being accepted by the town. Fortunately, its an Tony Abu community and Tony is not insolvent and generally takes care of things.

    Although some who posted on the related article would have you beleive we live in a “private community” that’s not the case — its simply a road in an unfinished development. We pay the same taxes as everyone else, and accordingly deserve the same services. If, technically, the developer is responsible for the service to the street, so be it, but if that developer goes belly up, the town should step up to help its residents … whether they are technically obliged to do so or not. It’s called COMMUNITY.

  4. Congrats to the Cortland Manor residents for taking matters into their own hands and patching the potholes. Clearly the Developer is responsible, and the Bond should be quickly used for this issue.

    Is it fair to wonder if we would have difficulty collecting on the Bond if we were represented by one of the State power-brokers?

    Either way, I would now like to ask the town to come back and repair a street near me: Woodside. This road was developed and accepted by the Town over 50 years ago. Two years ago, the road was dug up for town water pipes, then patched over. The patches have sunk, creating an unsafe road surface (did the DPW error in assessing the underlying soil structure?).

  5. Do you guys sign something during your home closing, or is there something on your deed, that explains the risk you guys are now facing?

  6. Michael

    There was absolutely NOTHING that we signed when we closed on our home in Cortland Manor…and nothing on the deed either…

    Being from out of state we never imagined that a town would allow developers such control over their infrastructure!

    I will say that we chose the neighborhood we did because our developer, Jon LeClaire, had invested heavily in a first class infrastructure. Our neighborhood is fortunate to have underground electrical wires, gas, public water and sewers.

    I will also say that until his recent financial troubles our roads were plowed better on our “private” end of the development than the “town owned” end of the develoment!

    Needless to say I do believe this will all work out – we will have some “pot holes” along the way – but as you can see our neighborhood works together and I know it will all work out in the end.

  7. Whatever the risk we may have assumed in fixing the pot holes is far less than the risk we faced having to dodge the holes!

  8. Congrats to the Cortland Manor residents for taking matters into their own hands and patching the potholes. Clearly the Developer is responsible, and the Bond should be quickly used for this issue.

    Is it fair to wonder if we would have difficulty collecting on the Bond if we were represented by one of the State power-brokers?

    Either way, I would now like to ask the town to come back and repair a street near me: Woodside. This road was developed and accepted by the Town over 50 years ago. Two years ago, the road was dug up for town water pipes, then patched over. The patches have sunk, creating an unsafe road surface (did the DPW error in assessing the underlying soil structure?)….

  9. Hmmm…on further review, did I hear BOS Member Brook Padgett correctly? Did he say that “the other 18,400 people voted in favor” of PAYT? This was in response to Ernie Peters’ comment that the 400 who attended the Town Meeting voted against PAYT.

    I know that the Town Meeting vote was meaningless because PAYT was already voted in as part of the Annual Budget.

    But, who’s numbers are correct?

  10. Which numbers are correct?

    First, it’s more like 10,000 than 18,000 since that is the number of registered voters and they are the only ones who can “vote”. But was the point that by not coming to Town Meeting and not voting against it all those people effectively indicated that they did not care enough about it to come out? On the record only a few hundred out of more than 10,000, just a few percent of the voters, spoke up to say they were opposed to it?

    If a few thousand of the voters, maybe just 20 or 30 percent of the eligible voters, had shown up and voted against it the Selectmen would have reveresed their decision “in a heart beat”. But at this point no one can say how 97 percent of the voters feel about it.

  11. By the way, further research confirms there were 304 votes cast on that article, rather than the 400 that was mentioned, and more of those were for PAYT than were against it, so even though it was a non-binding sense of the meeting vote, and so it was “safe” to vote against PAYT to send a message, in the end it still failed to get a majority.

    For the details check Article 5 in http://www.grafton-ma.gov/Public_Documents/GraftonMA_Meeting/2009/ATM%20-%205-11-2009%20-%20MINUTES.pdf

    The bottom line there: “The Moderator declared the sense of the meeting motion defeated by a standing vote of 146 affirmative and 158 against.”

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